Recent Work

I am so pleased to have two major projects I have worked on opening soon. 

Image courtesy of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum

Image courtesy of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum

1) Chicago History Museum's Inspiring Beauty: Fifty Years of Ebony Fashion Fair opening at The George Washington University Museum and the Textile Museum on March 30. 

I was so pleased to be able to bring this important exhibition to my hometown of Washington, DC. Inspiring Beauty is the first-ever exhibition about the Ebony Fashion Fair. It is a story of vision, innovation and power told through the history of Eunice Johnson, co-founder of Johnson Publishing Company, and the prism of iconic fashion from Christian Dior, Yves Saint-Laurent and Patrick Kelly among others. 

NPR did a wonderful piece on the exhibition when it first debuted Chicago History Museum in 2014. 

Image courtesy of Winterthur Museum

Image courtesy of Winterthur Museum

2) Treasures on Trial: The Art and Science of Detecting Fakes opening at Winterthur Museum and Gardens on April 1. 

This is one I am particularly proud of and so happy to have worked alongside art fraud expert Colette Loll again on an exhibition relating to fakes and forgeries in the art world. Collaborating with Linda Eaton and the incredible team at Winterthur was such an incredible honor, not to mention the numerous colleagues in our field who shared their research and scholarship with us so generously. 

Treasures on Trial: The Art and Science of Detecting Fakes exhibits over 40 objects including artwork, couture, silver, sporting memorabilia, wine, musical instruments, antiquities, and stamps along with ceramics, furniture, and folk art, examining how rarity, supply, and desirability can make anything fair game for a clever forger. Featuring several high profile cases and scientific discoveries, the exhibition highlights how evidence and new scientific techniques reveal the truth regarding the authenticity of these items and lends insight to the colorful motives behind why they were created.

Read a review about the exhibition in the Associated Press here